Tennis Elbow Treatment With Hand Muscle Strength Exercises

Increase your hand muscle strength with the Handmaster Plus. It’s the best treatment exercise for complete hand, wrist, forearm and arm strengthening for all grip strength and training and power sports, including golf, tennis, baseball, basketball, football, hockey, gymnastics, body building, jet ski, motocross, skido, quad, climbing, bowling, arm wrestling, martial arts, ultimate fighting, UFC, snow board, boxing, karate, Jiu jitsu, lacrosse, cricket, rugby, shooting and archery.

The Handmaster Plus provides complete strengthening, treatment and training exercises that strengthen the finger and wrist extensor muscles as well as the finger flexor muscles, providing complete strength, stability and rehabilitation.

Handmaster Plus is also used by musicians, including string instruments, guitar (guitarist, banjo, violin, bass, fiddle), drums (drummers), keyboard (piantists, piano, organ, organists) and wind instruments (flute, saxophone, trombone, clarinet, etc.) to maximize performance and prevent pain and injury and provide relief from pain.

Handmaster Plus is used in the workplace (crafts, dentists, dental techs, surgeon, beauticians, barbers, computer workers, video games, PDA, etc.) to treat, prevent and provide relief from painful RSI (repetitive stress injury) like carpal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow, tendinitis, Dequervain’s, repetitive strain, overuse, strain, sprain of finger, thumb, wrist, carpal tunnel, forearm or elbow.

In the video below, Dr. Terry Zachary explains treatment and the cause of tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) and demonstrates hand muscle strengthening exercise for injury prevention, prevention of pain and tenderness and therapy and rehabilitation of elbow pain conditions gaining relief using Handmaster Plus.

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  1. doczac, 21 June, 2008

    Natalie:
    Consult with a therapist that is skilled in upper extremity treatment. What I can tell you is that both cts and tennis elbow occur when the same underlying imbalance condition is present, that being overused finger/wrist flexor muscles and weak finger/wrist extensors. The condition must be resolved before rehabilitation will be safe or effective. Eventually you will have to address the muscle imbalance, but first see a professional therapist to address your symptoms.
    Best regards,
    T

  2. neoxz82, 15 July, 2008

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  3. tolmbyf0u, 01 September, 2008

    dude im so pissed i’ve had tennis elbow like 3 times and im 13. first time was in march i was riding my bike when i hit a bump and both my elbows where twisted strangely and i had severe pain in both my elbows for about 3 months. which was pretty much hell. right now i have it in my left elbow from once again, riding my bike. it’s not that bad this time but it’s really iritating. i can barely do anything…are my elbows weak from the first incident or is it just bad luck?

  4. tolmbyf0u, 01 September, 2008

    how much do they cost by the way?

  5. doczac, 02 September, 2008

    Hi tolmbyf0u:
    The first incident may have caused elbow injury, but most likely the elbows were weak originally. Most people develop static muscles at the elbow, stabilizing grip repetitively (5 muscles at the elbow are grip stabilizers). Our Handmaster Plus product is designed to strengthen all 5 of these muscles & much more. Regular use will build strength and blood flow & greatly reduce the chance of re-injury.
    Best,
    doczac

  6. tolmbyf0u, 03 September, 2008

    is it rare getting tennis elbow from riding a bike or is it fairly common? i was gripping pretty hard coz it was uphill and im 100% sure that’s what caused it

  7. doczac, 03 September, 2008

    Hi tolmbyf0u:
    It is common to get tennis elbow in any grip related activity. Please review our tennis elbow video as a reminder that the finger extensor and wrist extensor muscles are contracted heavily and often overused in gripping alone. Then, in some activities (bicycling, painting, tennis, golf, kayaking are examples), the hand can be gripping PLUS an extra stress on the elbow in pulling (as in the handle bars for momentum in cycling) or swinging; double stress at the elbow!
    Best,
    doczac

  8. bboyjkang, 15 September, 2008

    thanks for all the informative videos
    I have tendinitis/tennis elbow from using a keyboard that was placed too high
    when I use the handmaster, do I have to do the contracting action also?
    since my flexor muscles have been overused already, shouldn’t I skip the contracting of the ball and focus on the expanding of the hand?
    thanks

  9. doczac, 15 September, 2008

    Hi bboyjkang:
    Great q, one that we get a lot. First, consult with a health care expert; they can examine directly. In general, I do recommend that you contract as well, as we do want your hand to go through a full, natural range of motion. This maximizes blood flow & lymph drainage (bringing 02 & nutrients to tissues & removes toxins & waste). To address flexor vs. extensor muscle imbalance, I suggest you alter exercise & hold contraction for a 1 count & extension for a 2 count.
    Best,
    doczac

  10. MickyTewary, 28 September, 2008

    hey doczac,
    I’ve been working out in the gym for about a year now, and i thought that i was able to handle heavier (than what i was doing) weights.. I increased the weight while doing skull crusher (tricep exercise) and heard a ‘raw’ (for the lack of a better word) snap in what i think is the lateral epicondilytis.. and now everytime i try to work on my tricep, its pretty painful.. but it doesn’t bother me in any way when im not working out.. is this also a tennis elbow?

  11. doczac, 30 September, 2008

    Hi MickyTewary:
    Lateral epicondylitis is the most common elbow condition, especially if the pain is on (or slightly distal to) the lateral epicondyle. If it hurts to resist wrist supination, then probably lateral epicondylitis.
    It sounds more likely that you strained your triceps tendon, common w/ skull crushers, especially if you use a straight bar (use EZ bar instead).
    See a therapist & add Handmaster Plus & brachioradialis/brachialis for exercises for elbow stabilization.
    Best,
    doczac

  12. Traps59, 14 November, 2008

    If the pain is also accompanied with crepitus, will this product also decrease that as well or does it only work on the inflammation?

  13. doczac, 14 November, 2008

    Hi Traps59:

    Thanks for your q. Crepitus is an indication of joint instability and/or cartilage damage. Either way, increasing muscle tone, balance and blood flow to the joint is necessary. Work with a therapist to control your rehabilitation. Handmaster Plus is an excellent adjunct to strengthen, rebalance and restimulate the joint. Be controlled. Start with a soft resistance and move to medium resistance as progression allows.
    Best,
    doczac

  14. luke326, 26 December, 2008

    i have bad crunching sounds in my left elbow on the lower right side and it is possibly bruised from weight lifting. it is really bugging me and i have had it for around a month and i havent been doing it since.

    could you give further advice for my situation?

  15. doczac, 29 December, 2008

    Dear luke326:
    Thanks for your q. Though it is very difficult to diagnose over the internet, the elbow most commonly experiences muscle, ligament, cartilage or nerve injury (some injuries are a combination of all 4). Have the elbow examined. Most elbow injuries will respond well to initial rest (+ ice & heat alternated), followed by specific soft tissue massage & balanced rehabilitative exercise (for stability & healthy blood flow). Handmaster Plus works great for elbow rehab.
    Best,
    doczac

  16. DAWAXXX, 01 January, 2009

    hi doczac i wonder where i can buy handmaster in vancouver.if u let me know anywhere i can walk in and buy because i don’t like buying staff online. thanks.

  17. Picassolifeart, 22 January, 2009

    Can Carpal Tunnel lead to Tennis Elbow?

  18. doczac, 31 January, 2009

    Hi Picassolifeart:
    We see people with carpal tunnel also susceptible to tennis elbow as both have the same fundamental cause. One does not cause the other, both are a result of overuse & imbalance to the flexor vs. the extensor muscles of the hand & wrist. It is vital vital vital for people that use their hands to keep the flexor & extensor muscles strong & balanced. It is the specific reason why I designed the Handmaster Plus, for proper health, performance & injury prevention.
    Best,
    doczac

  19. Drummer2626, 14 February, 2009

    Your co. name is doczac ent. What does “ent” stand for?

  20. zdepth, 13 March, 2009

    can i buy it online on any site?

  21. BXMammal, 25 March, 2009

    I was recently diagnosed with tennis elbow. Due to the economy I was forced to due warehouse work and I have tennis elbow after 7 months of work. I’d love to buy that device but whenever I use my elbow, it hurts so using that device would be painful. Any suggestions?

  22. IHartJAsPeRHaLe, 10 April, 2009

    Can you develop tennis elbow in the side of your body opposite to the side of origin due to a new overuse of this side, because it is too painful to perform regular activities with your dominant arm? I have had TE for aprox. 2 days, and now I have it on the opposite side of my body with an even more extensive pain. I am currently taking 1g acetaminophen and 400mg ibuprophen (self-prescribed)

  23. smithia6, 19 October, 2009

    I have been a plasterer for 21 years and suffer with both of my elbows I have had cortisone in both elbows which eases it for a little time.
    If you can imagine the grip and wrist movement use everyday and the hard pressure i apply to polish hard plaster I can not get the required rest to cure my arms. lately in the mornings as my alarm clock goes off I start to scream in pain with my arm, with all to use over 21 years I have very strong arms and hands so i how does working them more help?

  24. MariosLasagna, 28 November, 2009

    To cure tennis elbow:
    1) Rest and ice for a month two times per day.
    2) Get Physical Therapy
    3) strength train very slowly and gradually.
    4) I recommend this product, I have it and the purple ball is great for the rehab-strength training phase.

  25. diegothome, 24 December, 2009

    Hi, how can i buy one of this ?

  26. johnathan @ plasterers epsom, 30 August, 2011

    ive got tennis elbow and it kills! its so irritating such small things you would normally take for granted are so difficult.

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